Lin Wood is not a friend to newspapers

Trump Youth retains infamous anti-newspaper lawyer Lin Wood.

Read about it here. If you’re interested in Wood’s history against newspapers, well, you know what to do.

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Small town newspaper with a small time editor

Goodloe Sutton. Good grief.

Read about the Democrat-Reporter newspaper in Linden, Ala., here.

And it gets better:

This isn’t Sutton’s first rodeo, either. As explored by Alabama Political Reporter’s Chip Brownlee, the Democrat-Chronicle has a long history of publishing racist and xenophobic articles and cartoons. You should go read APR’s round-up, because holy shit, but it’s essentially more of the same 1960s-era rhetoric: There’s the anti-Colin Kaepernick column where Sutton wrote that black people were taught 200 years ago to “kneel before a white man,” one headlined “Need cotton pickers” that somehow pivoted to an anti-Semitic rant, and a thank you letter to Russia for their role in the campaign against Hillary Clinton, who he refers to as “little Miss Piggy.”

Splinter

Wiley Miller’s in hot water

Before and after of the “Non Sequitur” that landed Mr. Miller some trouble.

Newspapers are dropping “Non Sequitur,” after the cartoonist Wiley Miller included a not-so-nice comment about POTUS.

The original, for those of you who can’t read backward, says “go fuck yourself Trump.”

Kevin Riley, editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, said Wiley Miller’s comic, “Non Sequitur,” will be replaced starting in today’s newspaper.
“Obviously, this does not meet our standards,” Riley said. “We apologize to all of our readers, and we’ve personally reached out to every single subscriber who’s contacted us.”

AJC — 02/12/2019

According to the AJC article, Miller says, “It was NOT intended for public consumption, and I meant to white it out before submitting it, but forgot to.”

“Non Sequitu” has run in many newspapers for the last 27 years.

See something, do something stupid

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The location: Upper Arlington, Ohio.

The players: Brandie Sharp and her sons, 17-year-old Mycah and 11-year-old Uriah.

The scene: Delivering “The Bag” (Columbus Dispatch) full of newspaper ads, to porches because new ordinance in town that means papers have to be delivered directly to someone’s porch or into a mail slot, versus the driveway.

Act 1: Uriah delivers to the wrong house, so walks back to pick up the papers.

Act 2: Someone calls the local 911 because

“It looked like at first they were delivering newspapers or something, but I noticed they were walking up to the houses with nothing in hand and one of them came back with something,”

Act 3: Police respond.

“When our officer arrived on scene, he very quickly determined very quickly that these individuals were delivering the newspaper.”

Act 4: Que the internets

Read about it here.

Good grief! The last thing we need…

… is a tariff that no one asked for that will cost American jobs. More blows to the U.S. NewsPAPER industry.

I’m sure there are more stories and editorials about this, but here are a few:

Tariffs on paper will hurt us, and our readers

You have read about the new tariffs on imported aluminum and steel, and on products from China. Now it seems our own business — newspaper printing and publishing — will take some casualties in a trade war over paper.

Trump’s Tariffs Are Already Costing American Jobs

Tariffs on Canadian paper, imposed at the behest of a New York hedge fund, are claiming 50 U.S. jobs — so far.

US publishers worry about pricier newsprint with new tariffs

Newspaper publishers across the U.S. already strapped by years of declining revenue say they’re dealing with an existential threat: Recently imposed tariffs on Canadian newsprint driving up their business costs.

It’s not surprising that President Trump, after campaigning on the promise of a more aggressive trade policy, would take aim at China. It’s an economic competitor and geostrategic rival with whom the U.S. ran a $375 billion trade deficit in 2017.

Editorial:  Drop counterproductive tariffs on imported Canadian newsprint

It’s not surprising that President Trump, after campaigning on the promise of a more aggressive trade policy, would take aim at China. It’s an economic competitor and geostrategic rival with whom the U.S. ran a $375 billion trade deficit in 2017.