Once again, Newspapers shine

Unfortunately, it takes a disaster to show off how Newspapers can really shine.

Some of my favs of yesterday’s P1’s thanks to my good friends over at the Newseum.

Comments on ad placement:

Oakland Tribune:  You got that right. The workd does change.

The Clarion Ledger: Bad. Just bad. Someone should have had the guts to pull this healthcare ad.

Design comments. Kudos to:

The Arizona Republic and The (Greeley) Tribune, for letting the image carry the page.

— Oakland Tribune, for asking the question we’re all thinking.

— Star Advertiser and Boston Herald for the two-page wrap.

— The Virginian-Pilot for that screaming-this-is-important-Jesus head.

The Brownsville Herald, this is how you cover a big local story at the same time as a big national story.

Raspberries to the guys and gals at the:

— Calgary Sun who wrote that stupid Nowhere to run head and then put it in ALL CAPS!

— The Fort Collins Coloradoan, for dropping their flag into the hard news photo. Jeez guys. Save that shit for FEATURES!

Haven’t made up mind mind on the Daily News. LIke the wrap. Debating the gore.

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Say Amen!

Journalism is largely an industry paralyzed by the past. Many of its leaders are the same people that drove our industry over the cliff. They cannot save journalism.

Our j-schools are spitting out people who celebrate the status quo. I’m here to tell you that if you try to emulate a dying industry, you will find yourself without an industry. We need you, all of you and your wildest ideas.

Journalism is largely an industry paralyzed by the past. Many of its leaders are the same people that drove our industry over the cliff. They cannot save journalism.

Is it time to turn out the lights?

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My good friend, the Newsosaur, documents the continuing decline of print ad sales (7 years in a row and counting):

As Google and other digital publishers move forward, newspapers and other legacy media companies for the most part have not committed to the bold investments in talent and technology required to deploy the contemporary and competitive digital products necessary to serve the readers and advertisers they want – and need.

If the print advertising business continues to contract in the future, publishers will have even fewer resources than they do today to transform themselves into true digital publishers. The market has voted. What are they waiting for?

Depressing. Just real, real depressing.